Navy Releases Collision Report for USS Fitzgerald and USS John S McCain Collisions

http://ift.tt/2zassbS

WASHINGTON (NNS) — The Navy released Nov. 1, a report detailing the events and actions that led to the collision of USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) and ACX Crystal off the coast of Japan June 17, and the collision of USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) and merchant vessel Alnic MC Aug. 21.

“Both of these accidents were preventable and the respective investigations found multiple failures by watch standers that contributed to the incidents, said Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson. “We must do better.”

“We are a Navy that learns from mistakes and the Navy is firmly committed to doing everything possible to prevent an accident like this from happening again. We must never allow an accident like this to take the lives of such magnificent young Sailors and inflict such painful grief on their families and the nation.

“The vast majority of our Sailors are conducting their missions effectively and professionally – protecting America from attack, promoting our interests and prosperity, and advocating for the rules that govern the vast commons from the sea floor to space and in cyberspace. This is what America expects and deserves from its Navy.

“Our culture, from the most junior sailor to the most senior Commander, must value achieving and maintaining high operational and warfighting standards of performance and these standards must be embedded in our equipment, individuals, teams and fleets.

We will spend every effort needed to correct these problems and be stronger than before,” said Richardson.

USS FITZGERALD

The collision between Fitzgerald and Crystal was avoidable and resulted from an accumulation of smaller errors over time, ultimately resulting in a lack of adherence to sound navigational practices. Specifically, Fitzgerald’s watch teams disregarded established norms of basic contact management and, more importantly, leadership failed to adhere to well-established protocols put in place to prevent collisions. In addition, the ship’s triad was absent during an evolution where their experience, guidance and example would have greatly benefited the ship.

USS JOHN S. MCCAIN

The collision between John S. McCain and Alnic MC was also avoidable and resulted primarily from complacency, over-confidence and lack of procedural compliance. A major contributing factor to the collision was sub-standard level of knowledge regarding the operation of the ship control console. In particular, McCain’s commanding officer disregarded recommendations from his executive officer, navigator and senior watch officer to set sea and anchor watch teams in a timely fashion to ensure the safe and effective operation of the ship. With regard to procedures, no one on the Bridge watch team, to include the commanding officer and executive officer, were properly trained on how to correctly operate the ship control console during a steering casualty.

Download: Collision Report for USS Fitzgerald and USS John S. McCain Collisions

http://ift.tt/2hvawPx

PHOTOS AND VIDEOS

USS JOHN S. MCCAIN:

-Photos of 10 Sailors killed aboard USS John S. McCain (DDG 56), family and official: http://ift.tt/2zX1EJe

-Photos of USS John S. McCain (DDG 56): http://ift.tt/2zY4lKr

-Video of USS John S. McCain (DDG 56): http://ift.tt/2zX6Ywa

USS FITZGERALD:

-Photos of the seven Sailors killed aboard USS Fitzgerald:
http://ift.tt/2zXjrQm

-Video (interviews and b-roll) of fleet level support to the crew of USS Fitzgerald after collision: http://ift.tt/2zYO7B1

-Video of statement from Vice Adm. Joseph P. Aucoin, U.S. 7th Fleet commander, regarding USS Fitzgerald’s return to Fleet Activities (FLEACT) Yokosuka after collision: http://ift.tt/2zYv5KU

-Video of USS Fitzgerald returning to Fleet Activities (FLEACT) Yokosuka following collision: http://ift.tt/2zXKpY0

-Photos of USS Fitzgerald returning to Fleet Activities (FLEACT) Yokosuka after the collision: http://ift.tt/2zYpJ2e

-Video of USS Fitzgerald moving into Dry Dock 4 at Fleet Activities (FLEACT) Yokosuka to continue repairs and assess damage from its June 17 collision: http://ift.tt/2zYirM1

November 1, 2017 at 02:22PM

Turkish Cargo Ship Sinks in Black Sea, 10 Missing

http://ift.tt/2xLytb6

Turkish Cargo Ship Sinks in Black Sea, 10 Missing

turkish ship bilal bal sinks
MV Bilal Bal. File Photo: Tahsin Mete / MarineTraffic

ReutersISTANBUL, Nov 1 (Reuters) – A Turkish cargo ship with 10 crew on board sank in the Black Sea near the Asian side of Istanbul early on Wednesday morning, according to the coast guard.

The cause was still unclear. The ship, Bilal Bal, was carrying cast iron from Turkey’s northwestern province of Bursa to the northern province of Zonguldak, the Dogan news agency reported.

“Unfortunately, one of our cargo ships sank in … the Black Sea,” Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said. Search and rescue operations were continuing, he said.

Three boats, one helicopter and one plane belonging to the coast guard were conducting search and rescue operations, according the coast guard. Empty lifeboats had been found as well as some life jackets, the coast guard said.

Five boats more were deployed to aid in the operations, as well as a remotely operated underwater vehicle from the Turkish naval forces, it said.

(Reporting by Can Sezer; Writing by Daren Butler and Ali Kucukgocmen; Editing by Dominic Evans and David Dolan, Larry King)

(c) Copyright Thomson Reuters 2017.

November 1, 2017 at 05:36PM

Shipping must improve navigation safety – Marine Electronics and Communications Magazine

http://ift.tt/2ykXlLl

Shipping must improve navigation safety
Marine Electronics and Communications Magazine
Shipping companies must improve their navigational safety records, double check that ECDIS is setup properly and constantly updated. They should ensure bridge teams know how to use the equipment properly to set safe voyage plans and execute them.

November 1, 2017 at 05:32PM

VIDEO: Maersk ship at center of massive NZ cocaine bust – Marine Log

http://ift.tt/2iQiciD


Maritime Bulletin

VIDEO: Maersk ship at center of massive NZ cocaine bust
Marine Log
NOVEMBER 1, 2017 — ​A five-month New Zealand Customs and Police investigation has led to the arrest of four foreign nationals after an estimated 46 kilograms of cocaine, with a street value of around NZ$20 million (about US$14 million), was seized
$20 million cocaine delivered to Tauranga by container shipMaritime Bulletin (press release)

all 12 news articles »

November 1, 2017 at 04:53PM

‘Glory Amsterdam’ freighter may remain stuck on German sandbar until Friday – euronews

http://ift.tt/2A4oH5v


euronews

Glory Amsterdam‘ freighter may remain stuck on German sandbar until Friday
euronews
BERLIN (Reuters) – It may take until Friday to free the grounded freighter “Glory Amsterdam” from a sand bar near the North Sea island of Langeoog, German authorities said on Wednesday, but no holes or cracks are evident in the ship’s hull to trigger

November 1, 2017 at 11:49AM

$20 million cocaine delivered to Tauranga by container ship – Maritime Bulletin (press release)

http://ift.tt/2A6911Z


Maritime Bulletin (press release)

$20 million cocaine delivered to Tauranga by container ship
Maritime Bulletin (press release)
Four persons were arrested in Tauranga NZ after they took a shipment of cocaine from hidden compartment on the exterior of the hull at night Oct 31, say NZ media. Customs and Police investigated drug criminal ring for 5 months, and were expecting this …
$20m of cocaine seized in Tauranga by police and customsStuff.co.nz

all 11 news articles »

November 1, 2017 at 06:55AM

Training – the hidden cost of environmental regulation – ShipInsight (blog)

http://ift.tt/2iPbfOZ


ShipInsight (blog)

Training – the hidden cost of environmental regulation
ShipInsight (blog)
Last week in our comment on the Muros grounding caused by incorrect use of ECDIS, ShipInsight highlighted that the UK MAIB has investigated several incidents involving a similar lack of familiarity with the ECDIS equipment. All of the events occurred

November 1, 2017 at 05:43AM

Hello world!

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start writing!