Kongsberg and Wilhelmsen to create autonomous shipping JV

Kongsberg and Wilhelmsen to create autonomous shipping JV Ship Technology Full coverage

Source: Kongsberg and Wilhelmsen to create autonomous shipping JV

Kongsberg has partnered with Norwegian maritime company Wilhelmsen to establish a new autonomous shipping joint venture (JV), Massterly.

Massterly will provide a complete value chain for autonomous ships, starting from design and development, to control systems, logistics services and vessel operations.

With headquarters in Lysaker, Norway, Massterly is scheduled to be fully operational from August.

Wilhelmsen group CEO Thomas Wilhelmsen said: “As a world-leading maritime nation, Norway has taken a position at the forefront in developing autonomous ships.

“Through the creation of the new company named Massterly, we take the next step on this journey by establishing infrastructure and services to design and operate vessels, as well as advanced logistics solutions associated with maritime autonomous operations.”

The new JV will comprise land-based control centres to monitor and operate autonomous ships in Norway and across the globe.

Massterly will combine Kongsberg’s technological expertise and solutions with Wilhelmsen’s experience in logistics and ship management operations.

“Massterly will be crucial for digitalising the infrastructure and operations.”

Kongsberg president and CEO Geir Håøy said: “Autonomy and remote operations are an important development for the maritime industry and Norway’s lead has been made possible as a result of close cooperation between the Norwegian maritime cluster and the Norwegian authorities.

“When autonomous ships soon are a reality, Massterly will be crucial for digitalising the infrastructure and operations.”

In May last year, Kongsberg collaborated with Yara to build the world’s first autonomous and fully electric container vessel named ‘Yara Birkeland’.

The 6m-long, 2.4t vessel is expected to start its first round of tests and operations early next year, as well as conduct fully autonomous operations in 2020.

Kongsberg expects to use Massterly to deliver and operate autonomous vessels such as Yara Birkeland.

Meet the marine pilots who guide enormous ships into Sydney Harbour

Meet the marine pilots who guide enormous ships into Sydney Harbour Radio Australia Full coverage

Source: Meet the marine pilots who guide enormous ships into Sydney Harbour

Captain Jonathan Drummond is descending a rope ladder hanging from a 70,000 tonne cargo ship, while waves of up to six metres break around him.

He’s just taken navigational control of the Wide Charlie and sent it safely on its journey from Port Botany to Brisbane.

It’s all in a day’s work for a marine pilot.

“It’s a very big satisfaction for me to be able to do that in one piece,” Captain Drummond said.

“The ships are quite fragile.

“They look like big, strong things but in actual fact it’s a relatively small skin thickness on the bottom of the ship and it’s very easy to do damage to them.”

What is a marine pilot?

Marine pilots are highly experienced seafarers, who venture out in small boats or helicopters to meet cargo and cruise ships on the open ocean.

With expert local knowledge of tides, currents, depths and hazards, marine pilots take navigational control of the visiting vessel and guide it safely to port.

When the ship is ready to leave port, marine pilots do the same process in reverse.

The work of marine pilots goes mostly unnoticed and that’s just how Sydney Harbour Master Captain Philip Holliday likes it.

“We view that as a big success, that people don’t really notice us so much, because we’re working harmoniously with everyone,” he said.

“In Sydney, the particular challenge we have is bringing the larger vessels safely in and out in a very busy harbour.”

Pilotage hasn’t always been the professional operation it is today.

“It stems back a long, long way,” Captain Holliday said.

“Locals who knew about the tides and the currents, the best places to avoid and the best places to go, would race out to the ship and sell their services to bring the ship in.

“We’ve moved on quite a long way from that, but the concept remains the same,” he said.

In the 1800s, pilots in Sydney reached arriving ships by oar-powered whaling boats.

The economic imperative

It’s not just cargo ships that require the skills of marine pilots.

More Australians are taking cruise holidays than ever before, making it the country’s fastest growing tourism sector.

Each cruise ship that docks in Sydney’s Circular Quay is manoeuvred by a local pilot, with expert knowledge of the tides, currents, depths and hazards of the harbour.

The Port of Botany and Sydney Harbour completed 4,357 pilot transfers last year, an average of 12 per day.

“[Shipping] is a multi-billion-dollar industry,” Captain Holliday said.

“Something like 96-97 per cent of all the goods that we import into Australia come by sea.

“Everyone talks about the mining boom and the mining that goes on in Australia, well, all of that cargo has to be exported and so it’s exported through ports, via ships.”

Ministry of Oceans to Hire Dozens of Maritime Pilots

SEOUL, April 3 (Korea Bizwire) — The Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries has announced dozens of openings for maritime pilots, one of the …

Source: Ministry of Oceans to Hire Dozens of Maritime Pilots

SEOUL, April 3 (Korea Bizwire) — The Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries has announced dozens of openings for maritime pilots, one of the most coveted jobs in South Korea.

Maritime pilots, who are hired to navigate ships through the sea, are responsible for ensuring that the ship they are abroad reaches its destination safe and sound.

Maritime pilot was named the second most satisfying job in South Korea in 2016, according to data from the Korea Employment Information Service, with the high average annual salary estimated at 133.1 million won.

Maritime pilots on average rank second only to company executives in terms of salary, according to the data.

In South Korea, around 250 maritime pilots are currently working across the country, guiding ships of different shapes and sizes through the sea.

Last year, a total of 156 applicants competed for a score of positions, signaling a growing interest in the unique job.

To be qualified as a maritime pilot, candidates are required to have five years of experience as a captain of a ship weighing over 6,000 tons.

Against this backdrop, being a maritime pilot is one of the most coveted career moves among former captains.

The application period runs between May 21 and June 1, and candidates are required to submit all the required documents to one of the 11 regional offices of Oceans and Fisheries across the country.

Ashley Song (ashley@koreabizwire.com)

Different world onboard yacht for San Francisco bar pilot

Source: Different world onboard yacht for San Francisco bar pilot

By Capt. Paul Lobo

My first and only pilot job on a yacht was in the summer of 2007. I thought I’d never pilot one because I was retiring that year. So the day the dispatcher told me I was going to pilot the yacht, New Century, into Sausalito, California, I thought he was kidding. For one, when the dispatcher says you have a certain ship, there is always the chance that that ship will arrive earlier, or later, than their estimated time of arrival at the pilot station.

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