Container ship OOCL Scandinavia joins OOCL fleet

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In OOCL’s series of six ‘G Class’ containerships on order at the Samsung Heavy Industry (SHI) shipyard, the Company introduced yesterday the newest and fifth 21,413 TEU containership, named the OOCL Scandinavia.

The OOCL Scandinavia will be joining her sister vessels on OOCL’s LL1 service, linking major markets in China and Northern Europe together.

Container ship OOCL Scandinavia joins OOCL fleet
Caption:  The OOCL Scandinavia unveiled at the christening ceremony held at the SHI shipyard


“In commemoration of this milestone at OOCL, we are very honored that Mr. Yue Yi, Vice Chairman, Executive Director and Chief Executive of the Bank of China (Hong Kong) Ltd, was able to join us as our Guest of Honor and witness the christening of the vessel.”

“The Bank of China is one of the finest and most respected international financial institutions in the industry and their support to OOCL has been tremendous, allowing us to be the best that we can be in providing quality transportation and logistics services around the world, but particularly in China, where OOCL launched and pioneered the reefer-on-rail services from Xian to Qingdao in 1998, the first of its kind in the country.”

As an active industry player in this vibrant market, facilitating trade and exploring new opportunities, OOCL was front and center in witnessing China’s remarkable growth momentum to become one of the world’s most influential economies today.  China is moving towards its next ambitious phase of development by working more closely with its trading partners to realize the One Belt One Road initiative in promoting trade and commerce.  In his remarks at the ceremonial event, Mr. C. C. Tung, Chairman of Orient Overseas (International) Ltd., commented on the importance of this initiative and also thanked the Bank of China for their support over the years.

“The One Belt One Road initiative comes at a very important time in the shipping industry where leadership and policy directions to stimulate demand growth is needed most,” said Mr. Tung. “We are in a very capital intensive business, and like the Belt and Road initiative, we cannot do it alone.  That is why we are very thankful to have our close business partners by our side in our journey, and we look forward to further deepen our working relationship with the Bank of China in the years ahead.”

Mr. Tung also thanked SHI for their dedication and support to OOCL over the years to consistently build vessels of the highest quality that greatly strengthened the competitiveness of OOCL’s fleet and capability to deliver reliable and efficient services to customers.

“The incredible work that has gone into the construction of this massive containership before us is the perfect embodiment of what teamwork means and how business collaboration can achieve wonders,” said Mr. Tung. “This achievement is about working to bring people and companies of different professions and nationalities together to reach new heights, innovate, solve complicated engineering problems, and along the way, why not break a world record too!”

The OOCL Scandinavia will be joining her sister vessels the OOCL Hong Kong, OOCL Germany, OOCL Japan and OOCL United Kingdom in serving the Asia-Europe trade lane on the LL1 service and her port rotation is:

Shanghai / Ningbo / Xiamen / Yantian / Singapore / via Suez Canal / Felixstowe / Rotterdam / Gdansk / Wilhelmshaven / Felixstowe / via Suez Canal / Singapore / Yantian / Shanghai in a 77-day round trip.

Source: OOCL

November 22, 2017 at 08:15AM

Excessive Position-Fixing Intervals Challenge Safety

The Maritime Executive

By Carl Durow 2017-11-21 17:06:19

Excessive on board position-fixing intervals have been a contributory factor in some recent costly claims.

In one case, a laden bulk carrier grounded on a shoal, in circumstances where a previous inaccurate dead-reckoning plot was not detected in time. Although there were several contributory factors to the grounding, the club says that, if a more appropriate position-fixing interval had been employed, it is likely that the discrepancy between the erroneous dead-reckoning plot and the ship’s subsequently plotted position would have been observed in time to correct the situation and execute the course alteration safely.

In another case, a ship proceeding in a ballasted condition between two small islands was unexpectedly affected by a strong current, and grounded half-a-mile to port of track before the next fix was plotted. The ship was not employing parallel indexing, thus denying the officer of the watch two methods of detecting its heavy set to port.

Excessive position-fixing intervals can lead to the officer of the watch not detecting an error in navigation. Club inspectors continue to note a lack of guidance in passage plans for the frequency of position-fixing necessary on individual legs of each voyage. This is often accompanied by excessive intervals in closer proximity to land on inbound voyage charts. Naturally, every passage is different, but it is recommended that the passage planning stage considers the appropriate fixing intervals and provides guidance to the officer of the watch.

Carl Durow is Loss Prevention Manager for The London P&I Club.

The opinions expressed herein are the author’s and not necessarily those of The Maritime Executive.

Cyber liability and lack of regulation hindering implementation of unmanned ships

By Splash24

November 22nd, 2017 Almost two thirds (64%) of global marine industry executives believe there is uncertainty surrounding liability issues relating to unmanned ships should a vessel be involved in an incident as a result of a cyber-attack, according to a new report from global law firm Clyde & Co and the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science & Technology (IMarEST).

A survey of 220 marine industry executives from across the world also found that there is a lack of clarity around collisions involving unmanned ships, with 59% of survey respondents agreeing there is confusion surrounding the regulations in this area.

David Loosley, chief executive of IMarEST, said: “Technology is today advancing at an unprecedented rate and promises a host of new solutions for the maritime industry in terms of improved efficiency, safety and environmental performance. However, we should not be blinded by the benefits. We must also remain alert to the potential risks. This joint research report examines these vulnerabilities and how they might be addressed and is an important starting point for the industry to begin preparing for the future.”

Clyde & Co explained that current international shipping law states that vessels must be properly crewed, which means that unmanned ships are not presently permitted to enter international waters.

However, the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) announced in June of this year that it would begin to consider updating the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) to allow cargo ships with no captain or crew to travel between countries.

The Comité Maritime International (CMI) has also this year established a Working Group on ‘Maritime law for unmanned craft’ to consider how international conventions and regulations can be adapted to provide for the operation of unmanned vessels on the high seas.

Joe Walsh, a partner at Clyde & Co, commented: “The present state of SOLAS and collision avoidance regulations are being over taken by and holding back potentially industry-changing technology from being developed and implemented. Fortunately, the IMO, CMI and other industry interests appear to have recognised that there is a real appetite to test the water with unmanned ships at a commercial level. Industry will quickly need some legal clarity around cyber liability and collision regulations before any ground-breaking progress can be made.”

Over two thirds (68%) of survey respondents fear that unmanned ships present a greater cyber-security risk than traditional ships.

Uncertainty surrounding insurance

The report finds that another key issue is the availability of insurance cover for unmanned ships. Four of every five (80%) survey respondents think it is unclear how insurers will approach the new technology.

Other key findings from the survey include the statistic that nearly two thirds (63%) believe that the industry is not at all prepared in terms of infrastructure requirements for unmanned ships.


Starting out with the Informa Group in 2000 in Hong Kong, Sam Chambers became editor of Maritime Asia magazine as well as East Asia Editor for the world’s oldest newspaper, Lloyd’s List. In 2005 he pursued a freelance career and wrote for a variety of titles including taking on the role of Asia Editor at Seatrade magazine and China correspondent for Supply Chain Asia. His work has also appeared in The Economist, The New York Times, The Sunday Times and The International Herald Tribune.

Zim completes pilot of blockchain based paperless Bills of Lading

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Written by: Nick Blenkey

NOVEMBER 21, 2017 — Containership operator Zim Integrated Shipping Services has completed a pilot project using paperless Bills of Lading based on blockchain technology.

The new solution allows the secure exchange of original documents on the blockchain and was completed in cooperation with Sparx Logistics and Wave Ltd.

During the trial all participants issued, transferred and received original electronic documents using the Wave application; the containers, shipped by Sparx Logistics from China to Canada, were delivered to the consignees without a hitch.

An electronic substitute to the traditional Negotiable Ocean Bill-of-lading has been the industry’s Holy Grail for many years, says Zim, which is pioneering the new solution following a long market analysis;

The new blockchain-based system developed by Wave uses distributed ledger technology to ensure that all parties can issue, transfer, endorse and manage shipping and trade related documents through a secure decentralized network. The application is free for Shippers, Importers and Traders and requires no IT or operational changes.

Zim CEO Eli Glickman commented : "I’m proud that Zim leads the way in introducing blockchain technology to the shipping world, and congratulate our partners in this exciting initiative, Sparx Logistics and Wave Ltd.

"While we are still in the process of evaluating the technology, we are confident that this type of forward-looking ideas will advance our industry as a whole towards a more efficient and modern phase," said Zim CIO Eyal Ben-Amram: "promoting innovation and technology in our industry is an integral part of Zim’s vision.

"Moving to a digital Bill of Lading would be hugely beneficial in supporting the supply chain in general, through reduced costs, error free documentation and fast transfer of original documents," said Wave CEO Gadi Ruschin. "We look forward to continuing the process and invite more of Zim’s customers and partners to join the pilots and use Wave for their business needs"

November 22, 2017 at 03:27AM

UK launches Industry Code of Practice for autonomous vessels

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The Code aims to provide practical guidance for the design, construction and safe operation of autonomous and semi-autonomous vessels less than 24 metres long
The Code aims to provide practical guidance for the design, construction and safe operation of autonomous and semi-autonomous vessels less than 24 metres long

Maritime UK has launched a new Industry Code of Practice for autonomous vessels which seeks to bridge the gap while more detailed regulatory framework for these systems is developed

The Industry Code of Practice for the design, construction and operation of autonomous maritime systems was launched during the 3rd Conference held by the MAS Regulatory Working Group in Southampton, UK.

The UK Industry Code of Practice has been prepared by the UK Maritime Autonomous Systems Working Group. James Fanshawe, the group’s Chairman said: “I am very grateful to both Maritime UK and the Society of Maritime Industries for publishing this Code which follows the publication of the Industry Code of Conduct last year.”

“These are exciting times and it is very important that every step is taken to ensure safety for everyone at sea, whether in manned or unmanned vessels.”

Practical guidance

The Code provides practical guidance for the design, construction and safe operation of autonomous and semi-autonomous vessels less than 24 metres long,

Covering design, manufacturing, safety, communication and navigation through to training and skills, the Code makes a comprehensive contribution to the fast-moving world of maritime autonomy.

It will be updated as required when guidance from the IMO Regulatory Scoping Exercise is published, and as the MCA develops policies to meet the needs of forthcoming technological, commercial and regulatory demands.

The Code of Practice can be found in full at http://ift.tt/2z9SfOd

By Anne-Marie Causer

November 21, 2017 at 05:25PM

ABB Ability Marine Pilot Vision Unveiled

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ABB has unveiled a new situational awareness solution that aims to make vessel operations safer and more efficient. The solution can be used by officers anywhere onboard a ship and marks the next step towards remotely controlled and ultimately autonomous ships.

 

ABB Ability Marine Pilot Vision takes advantage of the latest advances in

sensor technology

and computer vision to offer multiple real-time visualizations of a vessel’s surroundings and new ways of perceiving its situation. A virtual model of the ship is superimposed on real surroundings, making it possible to see the operation from a third person’s perspective. The officer can switch between views instantaneously, making it easier to predict vessel motions and be alert to previously hidden obstacles or collision risks. The resulting improvement in situational awareness has significant benefits for safety and operational efficiency.

 

“The launch of ABB Ability Marine Pilot Vision addresses an important step in the ongoing digitalization of ship operations,” said Juha Koskela, Managing Director at ABB Marine & Ports. “This new solution indicates an important landmark in ABB’s digital strategy and offering for our customers. It also demonstrates the aspiration and technology leadership that ABB has to offer for the maritime industry.”

 

The ABB Ability Marine Pilot Vision will be introduced to the general public for the first time during the tech event Slush, which is being held in Helsinki between November 30 and December 1.

 

“Computer vision has advanced significantly in recent years. With this new solution, ABB is leveraging that in order to present the ship and its environment in ways beyond ordinary perception. Crucially, we can do this in real-time in an intuitive fashion, which does not distract the crew from their work. In this sense, Ability Marine Pilot Vision extends the capabilities of the human senses,” said Mikko Lepisto, Senior Vice President of Digital Solutions at ABB Marine & Ports. “The solution can easily be installed on conventional vessels to improve situational awareness. What’s more, it enables new shoreside remote services, as well as totally new design options for new vessels as it provides unrestricted views of the surroundings from any location on board and even on shore."

 

“ABB believes that the next generations of vessels will be electric, digital and connected. Our recent fuel cell solution launch and ABB Ability Marine Pilot Vision give substance to this,” Koskela continues. ”Ultimately, Vision delivers a completely new user experience in ship operations. It also brings remotely-operated or unmanned ships into clear view. Unmanned ships will be dependent on fault tolerant and reconfigurable critical systems. Fuel cells,

energy storage

and renewable energy solutions fit perfectly with these targets, without compromising energy efficiency.”

November 21, 2017 at 09:46PM

France to push LNG as shipping fuel – PM

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PARIS, Nov 21 (Reuters) – France will support the uptake of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a cleaner fuel for ships by encouraging ports to develop the necessary infrastructure, its prime minister said on Tuesday.

LNG has been promoted as an alternative to fuel oil for a shipping sector facing tougher emissions standards from 2020, and French-based container shipping giant CMA CGM said this month it would be the first to use LNG to power giant container ships.

France will modify regulations on LNG to allow refuelling to take place at ports, and consider changing fiscal rules on amortising investments in new ships or engine technology, Prime Minister Edouard Philippe said in a speech to a maritime conference in the northern port town of Le Havre.

“We have to use this (energy) transition to differentiate ourselves on the market – in transport and in port services,” he said. “We want French ports to be equipped (…) with LNG installations and also the capacity to electrically charge ships.”

LNG is a relatively minor ship fuel, but with companies facing high costs to adapt traditional bunker fuel to upcoming emissions standards, it has attracted more attention.

CMA CGM has pointed to the supply chain as a key challenge for LNG fuel and said it was in discussions with partners including ports on how to adapt infrastructure.

The shipping sector is also testing electric models, with Norwegian fertilizer producer Yara working on what it says would be the world’s first fully electric and self-steering container ship. (Reporting by Jean-Baptiste Vey; Writing by Gus Trompiz; Editing by Mark Potter)

November 21, 2017 at 06:31PM

Hyundai Merchant Marine to Set Sail for 6th Place in World by Placing Orders for 20 Super Containerships

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Hyundai Merchant Marine (HMM) aims to become a top 10 global shipping company by ordering 20 super large containerships. HMM is expected to have a capacity of 800,000 TEUs and rank sixth in the world when the company secures a super large containership fleet.

Hyundai Merchant Marine to Set Sail for 6th Place in World by Placing Orders for 20 Super Containerships
Caption: Container ship Hyundai Drive – Image courtesy of Steve Greenwood


According to the investment bank (IB) industry and shipping industry on November 15, HMM will order 20 large-sized container ships starting early next year. “HMM will order 20 large-sized vessels, including nine 20,000-TEU containerships and 11 11,000-TEU containerships for aggressive fleet expansion,” a high-ranking official in the IB industry said. “This strategy aims to deal with major shipping companies’ expansion through mergers and acquisitions and the introduction of super large ships.” This is twice the size of the order projected in the market (around 10 units). In terms of order sizes (350,000 to 400,000 TEUs), HMM’s order is double that (220,000 TEUs as of the end of October) of Maersk, the world’s top shipping company.

An analysis says that HMM will ramp up the number of super large ships as a strategy to cope with the global division and congregation. HMM currently has 56 vessels and its capacity (maximum shipment volume) is 43,000 TEUs, ranking 13th in the world. On the other hand, Maersk which belongs to the 2M Alliance with HMM has a capacity of 3.55 million TEUs and MSC, 3.02 million TEUs, eight times that of HMM.

In particular, next year, Japan is expected to merge its three major shipping companies (MOL, NYK, and K Line). Then the new shipping company established via the merger is expected to have a capacity of 1.7 million TEUs. China’s major shipping company Cosco (1.81 million TEUs) will finally marry OOCL (670,000 TEUs) of Hong Kong, which is the seventh largest in the world in 2019. Then Cosco’s capacity (including that of ordered ships) will exceed 3 million TEUs, jumping to second or third place in the world.

In particular, China’s Cosco (Ocean Alliance) and Japanese shipping firms (THE Alliance) are expected to put 20,000-TEU containerships into the Asian market beginning next year. This means that HMM will not be able to compete in such an environment as the shipping company has a maximum capacity of 400,000 TEU and its largest container ship has a capacity of 13,100 TEUs.

Around the year of 2020, nine 20,000-TEU containerships and 11 11,000-TEU containerships to be ordered beginning next year will be delivered to HMM. Then, HMM will have a capacity of more than 800,000 TEUs, about double its current capacity. This volume exceeds that of now-defunct Hanjin Shipping and close to 1,060,000 TEUs of Evergreen, the biggest shipping company in Taiwan. At the time of the final delivery of the 20 vessels ordered, HMM will raise the number of its over-10,000-TEU vessels from 16 to 36. As HMM’s long-term plan aims at securing a one-million-TEU fleet, the shipping company may order more super large containerships depending on future business performances.

Source: BusinessKorea

November 20, 2017 at 01:49PM

Argentinian navy releases video of search for missing submarine – video

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A vast search by a multinational taskforce for an Argentinian submarine that went missing in the South Atlantic with 44 crew members four days ago has failed to provide details of its possible location. A total of 13 ships and six aeroplanes are braving strong winds and high waves over an area of 66,000 sq km (25,500 sq miles) more than 400 km (250 miles) east of the bay of San Jorge off the coast of Patagonia in southern Argentina. Argentina’s navy said it was not sure what had happened to the submarine but said it was now convinced the ship was beneath the surface and not adrift on choppy seas, as was previously thought

Search for missing Argentinian submarine fails to find any clues

November 20, 2017 at 07:16PM